WordCamp Orlando

Excited to share that I’m speaking at WordCamp Orlando next month! I’ll be talking about why you should prioritize a client’s user experience during the development phase. Skillcrush has a few team members in the area, so a few of us will also be hosting a little meetup (!!) during the camp. If you’re a local alum, holla for an invite. ❤️👯

Building a Community with WordPress

I got to join a bunch of awesome ladies for the Learn WordPress Webinar Summit this week. It was fantastic, if embarrassing. (I shared my very first WordPress website. :P)

I rattled off a bunch of resources over the course of my chat and promised to tweet about them later. For the sake of easy bookmarking, I’ve compiled them here!

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Back up your devices with Dropbox

I am a total space cadet at remembering to backup my computer… and my phone and… my everything, really. I have a very nice and nearly indestructible LaCie hard drive that works well, but Time Machine has always bugged me. For starters, it takes forever.

I haul my laptop around almost everywhere so asking me to sit still long enough to backup my whole computer is not going to happen on the regular. I’ve never understood why it has to back up all of my files anyway. Less than 10% of them have changed since the last time. If only Time Machine could detect new or updated files…

Enter Dropbox. I’ve had a paid account for a while. My office uses it in place of a traditional shared server and I routinely use it to send large files to freelance clients. Over the last year or so, I’ve become more and more obsessed with it. Recently, they upped the space in their paid accounts to a terabyte, which is a heck of a lot of room.

“What could I possibly do with all that space?” I wondered. Um, how about backup all my devices in a way that doesn’t require me to rethink my whole life.

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Getting it Together: Installing WordPress (and picking a theme!)

If there’s a universal truth about being a working artist, it’s that a web presence is absolutely necessary. If there’s another, it’s that they are are an absolute pain in the ass. 

Building and maintaining a portfolio, especially when you’re not a designer by trade, is frustrating. But not unlike your student loans, the need for a website isn’t going to disappear if you ignore it long enough. This is the sixth post in a series that will help you get it together. 

When I said you could build anything on WordPress, I wasn’t kidding. Though it’s most commonly used for static websites and blogs, plenty of people are using the CMS to build e-commerce sites, online classes, and even social networks. So when I say you have a lot of options, I really mean a shit fucking ton.

That being said, this series was always intended to help the early-career creative get started and so the more traditional website and/or blog combo will be the focus of this post. If you’ve already debated the merits of WordPress.com versus WordPress.org and decided on the latter, here’s everything you need to know to set up your website.

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Wordcamp Chicago: [Insert camping pun here]

As a self-taught developer, I’m always eager to take any opportunity to learn from others in the field. It’s nice to refresh old skills, learn brand new ones, and network with people who understand the highs and lows of your industry. At $60 a pop for three whole days of programming, WordCamp is the cheapest conference of substance I’ve ever come across.

An informal conference that attracts brand new bloggers and experienced developers alike, WordCamps are locally organized all over the world. I’ve attended the Chicago event only once before so when this year’s dates were announced, I corralled Glenn into coming along.

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